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Clinch Valley Times
St. Paul , Virginia
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September 8, 2016     Clinch Valley Times
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September 8, 2016
 

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8 :L Vol. LVIH, No. 36 576 EX/C SrnaUtown Papers 217 W. Cota Street Shelton WA 98584 "" 'The time has come,' the walrus said, 'to talk of many things...' "' Thursday, September 8, 2016 Saint Paul, Virginia PRESS Association 50 cents Last Sunday evening, after the dining rooms lights had been dimmed and the last dish had been washed, the employees of Sugar Hill Brewing Company caught their breath then congratulated one another on a job well done. After tallying the weekend's receipts, general manager Carey Watkins learned that over 500 peo- ple had been served within a two-day period. You can bet Carey and the other employees had the tired feet and happy smiles to prove it. The previous week, Sugar Hill Brewing Company had a private "soft opening." This was a dress rehearsal to shake out potential bottlenecks and do some t'me-tuning before the brewery and restaurant opened its doors to the pub- lic. Employees invited a limited number of friends and family to "Eat, Drink, and be Merry," then cri- tique their dining experi- ence. The results were both instructive and grati- fying. Menu offerings are unique, freshly-made, yet reasonably priced. Enjoy wings, burgers, homemade potato chips, fish, chicken, steak, homemade desserts and salad dressings - far too much to list here. There is also a children's menu and various soft drinks in addition to craft beers. Beef is supplied by Gent Farms of Russell County. The bill of fare is prepared with pride and skill by head cook Mark Smith, and sec- ond cook, Melvin Noaks. A complete menu may be Sugar Hill Brewing Company Ribbon Cutting Ceremony, Sept. 2, 2016. Pictured (L to R): Tim Blankenbecler, Small Business Development Center; McKinnen Leonard, head brewer; Carey Watkins, general manager; Dominic Bailey; Mayor Kyle Fletcher; Jennifer and Greg Bailey; Kathy Stewart, director St. Paul Main Street; Rick Colley, Wise Co Chamber of Commerce; Rick Chaffin, Russell Co. Chamber of Commerce; Wayne Anderson, Ninth District Development Fund. AA-Sundays and Tuesdays: Big Stone Gap, 8 pm, Episcopal Church. Tuesdays: St. Paul, 6:00 pm St. Paul United Methodist Church. Wednesdays: Wise, 8 pm, Trinity United Methodist Church. Fridays: Clintwood, 7:30 pm, Clintwood United Methodist Church. ST. PAUL IDA BOARD-Fourth Mondays, 6 pm, St. Paul Town Hall. ST. PAUL TOWN COUNCIL-Third Mondays, 6 pm, Town Hall. CASTLEWOOD W&SA-The Castlewood Water & Sewage Authority Board of Directors, 6 pm second Mondays. ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT-First Tuesday, 1 pm, Appalachian Agency for Senior Citizens ofice, Claypool Hill. Free. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS- Tuesdays and Saturdays, 8 pm Presbyterian Church, Norton. CASTLEWOOD LODGE #231-Stated meetings will be held the third Saturday of each month. The School of Instruction will be held on fourth Thursdays at 7. ST. PAUL LODGE #343 -Second Thursdays, 7:30 pm, Stated Communication; First Thursday, 7 pm School of Instruction. VFW POST #8652, DAV CHAPTER 12- 4th Tuesday, 7 pm, VFW, Riverview, Coebum. RUSSELL CO. BOARD OF SUPER- VISORS-First Monday, 6 pm, Lebanon. CLINCHFIELD LODGE #256-Stated Communication, 1 st Illll[l!i!!l[l![l!!t!llll Thursdays, 7:30; Tuesday; Closed School of Instruction Wednesday; 9:30-6 pm third Thursdays, 7 pm Thursday and Friday. R E C O V E R Y Saturday Closed. GROUP-The Wise Sunday Closed. County Mental Health D I C K E N S O N - Center conducts a B U N D Y - T h e recovery group for sub- Dickenson-Bundy Log stance abusers and fam- House is open weekly ilies Fridays at 10 am Thursday, Friday and Call 276-679-0810. Saturday 10 to 4 and ACOA MEETING- Sundays 1 to 3. Adult Children of SOCIAL SECURI- Alcoholics meet TY-The Wise Social Mondays, 7 pm, First Security Office is open Baptist Church, Mondays-Fridays from Coeburn. Call 762- 9am-4pm. Phone num- 0016, 276-395-6588 or bers are 1-800-772- 276-679-737i. 1213 or 276-679-7633. L1TrLE LEAGUE- L I B R A R Y The Clinch River Little FRIENDS-Friends of League Board meets at ,the J. Fred Matthews 3 pm third Sundays at Memorial Library, St. Ma Whitenack Little Paul meet at the Library League Field. All inter- on first Thursdays at 4 ested persons are invit- pm. ed to attend. VFW POST 9864- H.O.P.E. HOUSE- VFW Post 9864, H.O.P.E. House pro- Lebanon, welcomes vides emergency shel- new members, ff you ter for victims of served overseas during domestic violence in any war, write VFW Wise, Russell,Post 9864, P.O. Box Dickenson, Lee, Scott 1419, Lebanon; VA and Buchanan counties 24266 and send name, and the City of Norton. address and phone Volunteers needed- number. Transfers wel- training available. Call comed. 1-800-572-2278. HEALTH SER- SENIOR CITI- VICES-The Wise ZENS-The Castle- County Health wood Senior Citizens Department, Wise, is meet at 10 am open from 8am-8pm Wednesdays at the first Thursdays. Castlewood Lions Den. Clinics will be Anyone 60 or over is offered in family plan- invited, ning, pediatrics, school The Dante Senior and adult physicals, Citizens meet each WIC, Paps and immu- Monday and Tuesday at n i z a t i o n s . 10 am at the Dante Fire Appointments are nec- Department. Russell essary for all but immu- County residents 60 or nizations. For an older are invited, appointment, call 762- RUSSELL CO. 328-8000. LIBRARY-Hours at the F A C I L I T I E S Russell County Public AVAILABLE-The Library, Lebanon, are Tacoma Community Tue &Thur 10am-8pm; Center is available for Wed & Fri 10am- reunions, birthdays and 5:30pm; Sat 10-3pm. showers. Closed Sun & Mon. All proceeds reha- M A T T H E W S bilitate the Tacoma LIBRARY-Hours at the School as a Community J. Fred Matthews Center. For informa- Memorial Library, St. tion, call 395-6398. Paul, are: 9:30am- 100TH BIRTH- 6pm Monday; DAY-Appalachian 1 0 : 3 0 a m - 7 p m Agency for Senior Church and church-related activities Citizens recognizes persons in Russell, Dickenson, Buchanan and Tazewell counties who are 100 years old or older. Call Dana Collins, 1-800-656- 2272, to advise AASC of any upcoming 100th birthday. SUPPORT GROUP-Women sur- vivors of sexual assault are invited to attend Clinch Valley Communication Action, Inc./Family Crisis Services' sup- port group meeting with victims of similar situations Mondays, 10:30 am-12 noon. For information call Rande Hackler, 276-988-5583 or Ranetta Davis, 276- 889-8206. FREE ADULT ED- Free adult education classes are available in Lee, Scott and Wise counties and the City of Norton. Daytime and evening classes for adults who want to improve their basic skills. Instructors also assist adults with job- related skills including resume, writing and interviewing. For details, call 1-800-422- 3433 or 276-386-2433. TRANSPORTA- TION- The Appalachian Agency for Senior Citizens pro- vides disability trans- portation services in Buchanan, Dickenson, Russell and Tazewell counties to individuals with disabilities, regardless of age. Call 1-888-656-2272. GENEALOGY GROUP-The Russell County Genealogy Group meets 5:30 pm first Thursdays, Russell County Public Library, Lebanon. Group purpose is "to learn, to share and to perpetuate family history." William T. Fuller, 276-623-3410 See CALENDAR, Page 8 calendar on page 3 viewed on Sugar Hill Brewing Company's web- site at sugarhillbrewing.com/men u/ St. Paul's newest eatery has been nearly two years in the making. It repre- sents countless late evenings and weekends of hard work by the owners and their family. It also represents a significant capital investment in this community because the owner's expenses have not been offset with public money. This is a direct reflection of their confi- dence in the community they have chosen to call "home." They want this confidence to be conta- gious so other local resi- dents will establish viable businesses. Sugar Hill Brewing Company is located in the former "Tumer Building" on the corner of Broad Street and Fifth Avenue. The first business tenant of this late 1940's building was Smith Williams Motor Sales, a Studebaker dealer- ship. Other businesses that once occupied the site include New Hardware and Furniture Company, Rockwell Manufacturing, by Jerry Couch The following newspa- per article is partial tran- scription from the June 9, 1909 issue of The Evening News of Roanoke, Virginia. It describes a junket intended to induce cotton mill owners of the Charleston, South Carolina area to sign contracts to purchase Clinchfield coal as fuel for their steam- operated mills. Like Hansel and Gretel's trail of bread crumbs, it is likely a trail of champagne corks marked the path of Clinchfield's luxurious train. MILL MEN INSPECT CLINCH COAL FIELD " Party Was" Under Charge of Messrs. John H. Winder and E C Bryan, of Roanoke -- Special Train Used for the Purpose -- Something of the Wonderful Resources and Modern Methods of Mining Operations of the Clinchfield Corporation Mr. John H. Winder, president, and Mr. F. C. Bryan, manager of sales, of the Clinchfield Coal Corporation, have just returned from a most inter- esting trip through the Clinch coal fields. This trip was taken for the pur- pose of affording to a num- ber of South Carolina cot- ton mill men an opportuni- ty to view the wonderful property which this corpo- ration owns. The party was under the charge of Messrs. Winder and Bryan. The equipment for this delightful trip consisted of three private cars; a Pullman, a diner, and a storage car operated as a special from Charlotte to Dante and return. The accommodations provided on the trip were undoubt- edly.the best and most lav- ish ever offered on a simi- lar occasion. The special started from Charlotte on Tuesday night and was met as Bostic (the junction of the C. C. & O. and Seaboard) by the fol- lowing officials of the Johnson's Ben Franklin, a discount grocery store, Fisher Auto Parts, and Bailey Hardware. If the late W. A. Turner could see his building today, he would be amazed. It has undergone a transformation from utilitarian to fantastic. Hours of operation are 4 until 10 p.m. Wednesday through. Saturday, and 12 until 8 p.m. on Sundays. On Saturdays, a limited menu will be served from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. so comes Carolina Clinchfield & Ohio Railway: Mr. M. J. Caples, vice-president and general manager; Mr. J. J. Campion, traffic manager; and Mr. R. E Brewer, land and industrial agent. These gentlemen were entirely successful in arranging such a trip as gave the visi- tors very accurate and detailed information as to the different points of interest, the grades, eleva- tions, facts about tunnels, cost of construction, and numbers of other questions in regard to the scenes along the line of the road. It is absolutely necessary to see this beautiful rugged country in order to have the slightest conception of the number of interesting things the traveler would want to know and yet the gentlemen in charge passed out just what was desired and in a most accurate and pleasing manner. The special arrived in Johnson City, Tenn., early Friday afternoon, where it was met by the Commercial Club of that hustling city and taken for a car ride over the city and a visit to the National Soldiers' Home, where it is said the United States gov- ernment has expended over four millions of dollars in making what is a perfectly beautiful home for the injured and sick survivors of the civil war and the Spanish-American war. A night trip was made from Johnson City to Dante, Va. Upon the arrival of the special at Dante, the members of the party who could be induced to remain up and be lavished with further hospitality, were treated to an elegant banquet and dance in the beautiful school building of the Clinchfield Coal Corporation. In accor- dance with the schedule, the party Saturday morning donned regular outfits for miners, including caps and cap-lamps for the trip through the wonderful coal fields. The outfits were fur- nished from the company's patrons can watch football games on the 10-foot screen. Sugar Hill Brewing Company is closed to the public on Monday and Tuesday. The physical address is 16622 Broad Street, St. Paul, VA and the phone number is (276) 738-1088. Please join all of us at the Clinch Valley Times in say- ing "Congratulations and best wishes, Sugar Hill Brewing Company." commissary and presented to the visitors as souvenirs of the trip. The party boarded coal cars made entirely comfortable, so that better views might be had and visited what is known as the right fork of . the development. The right fork is as yet undergoing largely the preliminary work to opening the veins located on it. For the purpose of going into the mines where coal is actually being mined and turned out there was provided a number of dumps used to haul the coal from the mines to the tipples. These cars were drawn up the incline to the mine openings by large electrically-driven engines. Every detail of the mining was gone through with, showing in detail all the operations, making very prominent the enormous saving, in point of time as well as money, in the mod- em methods of mining as against old methods. Electricity generated from one central plant is used over the entire field for almost every move in the development. The coal is cut by the latest patented and improved coal digging electrically-equipped machinery, one machine turning out in a day an amount of coal which is the equivalent of twenty men's work for the same time by the old method. The visitor to the mines of the Clinchfield Coal Corporation cannot but be impressed with the excel- lent behavior of the miners and the contentment pre- vailing and yet, when is known that they reside in nicely-built, prettily-paint- ed houses, ideally located from every standpoint, it would occasion surprise if any other condition pre- vailed. Each home has running water, electric lights, and steam heat all furnished by the corpora- tion. In all there are over 3,000 people employed on the works, representing 27 different tongues. Various kinds of enter- See Clinchfield, Page 8