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January 3, 2013     Clinch Valley Times
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Page 6 CLINCH VALLEY TIMES, St. Paul, VA, Thursday, January 3, 2013 Make holiday cooking healthier with tips from TOPS Pie, mashed potatoes, cookies, and carved ham- these are just a few of the popular seasonal dishes we tend to consume more of during the holidays. According to Katie Ferraro, M.P.H., R.D., C.D.E., nutrition expert for TOPS Club, Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), the nonprofit weight-loss sup- port organization, the holidays don't have to sabotage your healthy meal planning. "Use parties and family get- togethers as an opportunity to try out new, healthy recipes and incorporate several of the fol- lowing tips into your upcoming celebrations," says Ferraro. "Special holiday recipes pre- pared healthier with simple substitutions can add nutrition and won't break the calorie bank." Mash cauliflower instead of potatoes - One cup of mashed potatoes made with skim milk and no butter has 150 calories while one cup of mashed cauliflower made with skim milk and no butter has one third of the calories, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and tastes nearly identical. For the pickiest eaters, mix half mashed cauliflower, half mashed potato. "Add flesh herbs in place of salt for zesty flavor," notes Ferraro. Unsweetened applesauce instead of sugar, oil or butter Cut calories in baked goods while providing a hint of sweetness with this substitute. According to the USDA, a cup of sugar contains 775 calories, while a cup of unsweetened applesauce contains only about 100 calories. Nutrient-rich leafy greens instead of iceberg lettuce - For an added boost of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, con- sider dark, leafy vegetables like arugula, chicory, kale, mustard greens, or spinach in place of iceberg lettuce for your salad. "Generally, the deeper the color of vegetable, the better the nutrition," says Feraro. Air-cured or other smoked meats instead of bacon - Substitute bacon with lower-fat and higher-protein Canadian bacon, turkey bacon, or pros- ciutto. According to Ferraro, one slice of bacon has 45 calories, while turkey bacon contains roughly half that amount. These meats are best enjoyed in limited quantities though, as they can still contain significant amounts of sodium. Finely-chopped prunes in- stead of butter in dark breads - Swap finely-chopped prunes or baby food prunes for oil, butter, or margarine in quick breads or other dark baked goods, like brownies. Cut calories and fat in half without compromising on sweetness or moisture. Steam in canned broth Snow and woody plants "Snow is both friend and foe to trees and shrubs," says Tchukki Andersen, staff arborist with the Tree Care Industry As- sociation (TCIA). "Snow causes its share of damage, as we all know, but in many cases it also protects plants and the roots against extreme fluctuations in temperature that could damage or even kill them." Snow does cause four kinds of damage to trees and woody shrubs: bend- ing; breaking; splitting; and falling or uprooting. Whether woody plants will be damaged in one of these ways depends upon several factors. Coniferous evergreens, for instance, can bear more snow weight than broadleaf evergreens. A tree's form can also be a factor in how well it will withstand heavy snow. Pine (low altitude), spruce and fir with spread branches are more likely to be damaged by heavy snowfall than trees with steeper angled branches. Arborvitae is a good example of a plant that doesn't handle heavy snow well. They tend to get tall, with multi-stemmed branches that are low to the ground. "Snow will cause the bran- ches to separate," says Andersen, who doesn't recommend plant- ing arborvitae species in areas that get lots of heavy wet snow. She also recommends against planting them near buildings where snow can fall off the roof all at once in large piles. "Small, rounded woody-stemmed plants would be a better choice, but make certain to give them enough root space away from the structure." A tree's structure is also a factor in whether it will be damaged by ice storms. A tree with good, right-angle branches will have less trouble than one with narrow, more vertical branch crotches. The type of snow is an important factor in potential damage to trees. Obviously, wet- ter snow is more damaging be- cause it is heavier. The time of season for snow can also be a factor. With a wet snow in March, when there are no leaves on the branches, the tree may be able to withstand damage pretty well. But that same snow in late spring or early fall, when the tree is filled with leaves, could add unbearable weight. On the plus side, snow moderates root temperatures and provides moisture for spring. Snow helps insulate the ground, which is beneficial for two reasons. First, snow is a poor heat conductor, so the temp- erature changes very slowly from the top layer of the snow to the bottom. This keeps the ground from heating and cooling as air temperatures fluctuate. Heating and cooling often cause the ground to heave, which can be damaging to roots. Keeping the ground temperature more constant is a better environment for healthy roots. A covering of snow can help keep the ground warmer. Pile eight inches of snow on the ground and soil temperature seldom falls below 23 degrees. Finally, a little breakage isn't always bad," insists Andersen. "Nature prunes trees, too. A wet snow may break off small twigs and dead branches. It can do a good job of pruning that way. Just follow up with some leaning cuts." instead of saut6ing in oil - For a tasty-low calorie and fat-fee alternative to oil sauteing, Fer- raro recommends steaming meats and vegetables in a half cup of reduced-sodium canned chicken or beef broth. Steaming vegetables in broth helps retain their nutrients and enhances flavor, as well. Fresh fruit instead of fruit canned in heavy syrup- Avoid processed foods like fruit canned in heavy syrup and opt for fresh fruit or fruit canned in its own juice or in water. Heavy syrup typically contains water, sugar, and corn syrup - with little nutritional value and lots of additional calories. If your budget is tight, purchase canned produce and then drain and rinse the fruit. Cacao nibs instead of chocolate chips - Cacao nibs, minimally-processed bits of cocoa beans, are semi-sweet and rich in antioxidants and essential minerals. Their crunchy texture and intense taste are a unique way to add a boost of flavor to holiday greats. Visitors are welcome to attend their first TOPS meeting free of charge. Membership is affordable at just $28 per year in the U.S. and $32 per year in Canada, plus nominal chapter fees. To find a local chapter, view www.tops.org or call (800) 932- 8677. SWCC offers introduction tO recreation course Southwest Virginia Commun- ity College will offer an introduction to recreation, parks and leisure studies course. Elements of this course include: history and philosophy of the recreation and parks movement, the theory of leisure and play, leisure service delivery systems, and career opportunities. Em- phasis is placed on commercial, non-profit and public sectors, Armed Forces, therapeutic re- creation as well as volunteer service. The purpose of the course is to provide the student who is planning a career in ad- venture tourism, outdoor recre- ation or parks with a basic understanding of the field and the career options available. This course is for you if you are interested in learning about the recreation and tourism industry or learning to expand your knowledge. To register or for additional information, contact the Busi- ness, Engineering and Industrial Technology Division at South- west Virginia Community Col- lege by calling 276.964.7277, by emailing beit@sw.edu or visiting httla://www.sw.edu/beit/. Baseball pre- season training Sportswise Sports & Per- formance Center will be offering a six week pre-season training program beginning January 5" for high school aged baseball players. Pitching and hitting instruction will be offered. For more information contact sportswiseoniine@gmail.com or [ I (2760 328"3300" Individual Classified advertising works...call 762-7671 softball hitting lessons also available. Close out holiday season with safety in mind Homes have been decorated, you that practicing safety now holiday decorations: gifts unwrapped and New Year's resolutions are ready to fill everyone's thoughts. With the onset of post-holiday activity, it's important to keep safety at top of mind. That's why the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL), an independent safety testing organization, are joining together this post-holiday season to remind consumers to practice safety as they put away holiday decorations. According to the NFPA, 13 percent of the home fu'es at- tributed to Christmas trees have occurred in January. The NFPA recommends consumers remove real trees from their home and properly dispose of them once their holiday celebration ends. Christmas trees - real or artificial - can be a significant fuel source if a f'lre occurs in your home. Even a well-watered tree should be taken down after four weeks. If you decorated your real tree right after Thank- sgiving, it should be discarded the week after Christmas. Christmas trees are not the only holiday decorations that need prompt attention after the holidays. All electric decorations should also be taken down and put away. Holiday lights are considered seasonal and should not be up longer than 90 days. If you leave decorations out any longer, they will be more prone to damage, which could cause an electrical shock or fire hazard. As you unplug and store holiday decorations, the NFPA and UL would like to remind can keep decorations in working condition and prevent potential hazards from occurring next year. Following are safety tips consumers can use any time (vhen putting away seasonal decorations: 1. To unplug electric decorations, use the gripping area provided on the plugs. Never pull the cord to unplug a device from electrical outlets. Doing so can damage the cord's wire and insulation and even lead to an electrical shock or fire. 2. As you're putting away electrical light strings,.take time to inspect each for flaws. Throw out light sets if they have loose connections, broken or cracked sockets or frayed or bare wires. 3. Do not place a faulty set of lights back into the storage box for next year's use. 4. Take the initiative now and throw out worn light strings. Shop for replacements during after-Christmas sales or add lights to your Christmas decoration list for next year. 5. Be sure to pack lights appropriately. No one likes to untangle a web of lights. When preparing your holiday lights for storage, consider purchasing a holiday light storage reel, or create your own system. 6. Store electrical decorations in a dry place, such as a suitcase, where they cannot be damaged by water or dampness. Also, keep them away from children and pets to ensure that cords and wires are not damaged in storage. Additionally, to preserve and ensure the longevity of your 1. Wrap each set of lights and put them in individual plastic bags, or wrap the lights around an empty wrapping paper tube or cardboard square. If you wrap the lights around a piece of cardboard, cut a slit in one side of the square. Thread the end of a set of lights through the slit. 'Wrap the lights around the cardboard, threading the other end back through the slit. 2. Although the box your artificial tree came in may seem like the perfect one to repack it in for storing, this isn't the wisest idea for preservation. The cardboard boxes begin to deteriorate making them more prone to insect infestation. 3. Special ornaments benefit from being stored in their original packaging. If you throw out the original box, store smaller ornaments in an egg carton. 4. Save yourself time next year by thoroughly labeling decorations before storing. Make a detailed inventory on the outside of each container. Number each to keep track of how many you have (for example, Box 1 of 12) and consider taping a piece of wrapping paper on the outside of each container for easy holiday storage identification. For more " information regarding holiday decorating safety, footage of how quickly a dry Christmas tree incinerates or photos related to holiday decoration safety, please visit the UL Newsroom web site at htt://www.ul.com/newsroom or the NFPA website at http://www.nfpa.org. Bell Nursery provides poinsettia Bell Nursery, the largest grower of plant material in the Mid-Atlantic and one of the largest growers in the nation, will move more than 1 million poinsettia plants in a dozen varieties of red, white and pink, through The Home Depot registers this holiday season. A tropical plant native to Mexico, the poinsettia was brought to the United States in 1825 by Joel Roberts Poinsett, the first United States Minister to Mexico. Since that time, the poinsettia has become one of the most popular holiday plants. Al- though, traditionally known for their bright red color, poinsettias come in a number of hues. This year, Bell Nursery has grown 12 unique designer poinsettia varie- ties such as "Visions of Grand- eur" and "Monet Twilight". With the holiday season fast approaching, Bell Nursery offers three simple tips to help your poinsettias look their best. Pick a healthy plant. The longevity of a poinsettia plant can be dependent on its pur- chased condition. Select a plant that has bright green leaves and colorful sturdy bracts. After returning home with the plant, remove its .protective covering and place m a location that receives indirect sunlight. Water the plant regularly. Practicing proper watering techniques is important to the survival of all plants. Poinsettias should be watered when the plant's soil is dry. A great way to water it is to take the plant to the sink, remove the foil wrapping and add water to the soil. The foil wrapping can be replaced, after the excess water has drained from the plant. The plant can also be placed in a saucer and the foil wrapping can be punctured at the bottom of the plant to allow drainage. Avoid direct sunlight. Be- cause poinsettias are tropical plants, they do require some sunlight. But, placing the plant care tips in direct sunlight can cause dam- age to the plant's leaves. Ex- treme low or high temperature and drafts should also be avoided. The belief that poinsettias are poisonous is a common miscon= ception. A number of organiza- tions, including Ohio State University, have documented that poinsettias are non-toxic and safe to be in homes where children and pets reside. As with many plants, poinsettias are not meant for ingestion and may cause discomfort if consumed. Poinsettias are wonderful additions to holiday d6cor; they also make great hostess gifts. Bell Nursery also offers a vat= iety of orchids, trees and d6cor-i ated shrubs that make perfect additions to any holiday celebra- tiori: For additional holiday dec- orating inspiration and images of Bell Nursery products available in The Home Depot stores visit Facebook.com/BellNursery or www.bellnursery.com CVTimes Deadlines: Editorial copy: birthdays, anniversaries, press releases, calendar items, reunions, etc 4 pm Monday Advertising: classified and display--12 noon Tuesday IFrom all of us -- a vertj Happtj New Year The Z013 Ford cars and trucks are arriving daily!! Buy one from Horgan HcClure Ford - It's the right thing to do! MORGAN McCLURE Saint Paul, VA morganmcclureford.com (276) 762-5535 ,,),, Everyone should have a plan. (.L1,,cr .\\; ,: Take the first step Talk to your family about what you would do in case of a terrorist attack or other emergency There's no reason not to To find out other things you can :io to be prepared, .org visit www readygov Page 6 CLINCH VALLEY TIMES, St. Paul, VA, Thursday, January 3, 2013 Make holiday cooking healthier with tips from TOPS Pie, mashed potatoes, cookies, and carved ham- these are just a few of the popular seasonal dishes we tend to consume more of during the holidays. According to Katie Ferraro, M.P.H., R.D., C.D.E., nutrition expert for TOPS Club, Inc. (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), the nonprofit weight-loss sup- port organization, the holidays don't have to sabotage your healthy meal planning. "Use parties and family get- togethers as an opportunity to try out new, healthy recipes and incorporate several of the fol- lowing tips into your upcoming celebrations," says Ferraro. "Special holiday recipes pre- pared healthier with simple substitutions can add nutrition and won't break the calorie bank." Mash cauliflower instead of potatoes - One cup of mashed potatoes made with skim milk and no butter has 150 calories while one cup of mashed cauliflower made with skim milk and no butter has one third of the calories, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and tastes nearly identical. For the pickiest eaters, mix half mashed cauliflower, half mashed potato. "Add flesh herbs in place of salt for zesty flavor," notes Ferraro. Unsweetened applesauce instead of sugar, oil or butter Cut calories in baked goods while providing a hint of sweetness with this substitute. According to the USDA, a cup of sugar contains 775 calories, while a cup of unsweetened applesauce contains only about 100 calories. Nutrient-rich leafy greens instead of iceberg lettuce - For an added boost of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, con- sider dark, leafy vegetables like arugula, chicory, kale, mustard greens, or spinach in place of iceberg lettuce for your salad. "Generally, the deeper the color of vegetable, the better the nutrition," says Feraro. Air-cured or other smoked meats instead of bacon - Substitute bacon with lower-fat and higher-protein Canadian bacon, turkey bacon, or pros- ciutto. According to Ferraro, one slice of bacon has 45 calories, while turkey bacon contains roughly half that amount. These meats are best enjoyed in limited quantities though, as they can still contain significant amounts of sodium. Finely-chopped prunes in- stead of butter in dark breads - Swap finely-chopped prunes or baby food prunes for oil, butter, or margarine in quick breads or other dark baked goods, like brownies. Cut calories and fat in half without compromising on sweetness or moisture. Steam in canned broth Snow and woody plants "Snow is both friend and foe to trees and shrubs," says Tchukki Andersen, staff arborist with the Tree Care Industry As- sociation (TCIA). "Snow causes its share of damage, as we all know, but in many cases it also protects plants and the roots against extreme fluctuations in temperature that could damage or even kill them." Snow does cause four kinds of damage to trees and woody shrubs: bend- ing; breaking; splitting; and falling or uprooting. Whether woody plants will be damaged in one of these ways depends upon several factors. Coniferous evergreens, for instance, can bear more snow weight than broadleaf evergreens. A tree's form can also be a factor in how well it will withstand heavy snow. Pine (low altitude), spruce and fir with spread branches are more likely to be damaged by heavy snowfall than trees with steeper angled branches. Arborvitae is a good example of a plant that doesn't handle heavy snow well. They tend to get tall, with multi-stemmed branches that are low to the ground. "Snow will cause the bran- ches to separate," says Andersen, who doesn't recommend plant- ing arborvitae species in areas that get lots of heavy wet snow. She also recommends against planting them near buildings where snow can fall off the roof all at once in large piles. "Small, rounded woody-stemmed plants would be a better choice, but make certain to give them enough root space away from the structure." A tree's structure is also a factor in whether it will be damaged by ice storms. A tree with good, right-angle branches will have less trouble than one with narrow, more vertical branch crotches. The type of snow is an important factor in potential damage to trees. Obviously, wet- ter snow is more damaging be- cause it is heavier. The time of season for snow can also be a factor. With a wet snow in March, when there are no leaves on the branches, the tree may be able to withstand damage pretty well. But that same snow in late spring or early fall, when the tree is filled with leaves, could add unbearable weight. On the plus side, snow moderates root temperatures and provides moisture for spring. Snow helps insulate the ground, which is beneficial for two reasons. First, snow is a poor heat conductor, so the temp- erature changes very slowly from the top layer of the snow to the bottom. This keeps the ground from heating and cooling as air temperatures fluctuate. Heating and cooling often cause the ground to heave, which can be damaging to roots. Keeping the ground temperature more constant is a better environment for healthy roots. A covering of snow can help keep the ground warmer. Pile eight inches of snow on the ground and soil temperature seldom falls below 23 degrees. Finally, a little breakage isn't always bad," insists Andersen. "Nature prunes trees, too. A wet snow may break off small twigs and dead branches. It can do a good job of pruning that way. Just follow up with some leaning cuts." instead of saut6ing in oil - For a tasty-low calorie and fat-fee alternative to oil sauteing, Fer- raro recommends steaming meats and vegetables in a half cup of reduced-sodium canned chicken or beef broth. Steaming vegetables in broth helps retain their nutrients and enhances flavor, as well. Fresh fruit instead of fruit canned in heavy syrup- Avoid processed foods like fruit canned in heavy syrup and opt for fresh fruit or fruit canned in its own juice or in water. Heavy syrup typically contains water, sugar, and corn syrup - with little nutritional value and lots of additional calories. If your budget is tight, purchase canned produce and then drain and rinse the fruit. Cacao nibs instead of chocolate chips - Cacao nibs, minimally-processed bits of cocoa beans, are semi-sweet and rich in antioxidants and essential minerals. Their crunchy texture and intense taste are a unique way to add a boost of flavor to holiday greats. Visitors are welcome to attend their first TOPS meeting free of charge. Membership is affordable at just $28 per year in the U.S. and $32 per year in Canada, plus nominal chapter fees. To find a local chapter, view www.tops.org or call (800) 932- 8677. SWCC offers introduction tO recreation course Southwest Virginia Commun- ity College will offer an introduction to recreation, parks and leisure studies course. Elements of this course include: history and philosophy of the recreation and parks movement, the theory of leisure and play, leisure service delivery systems, and career opportunities. Em- phasis is placed on commercial, non-profit and public sectors, Armed Forces, therapeutic re- creation as well as volunteer service. The purpose of the course is to provide the student who is planning a career in ad- venture tourism, outdoor recre- ation or parks with a basic understanding of the field and the career options available. This course is for you if you are interested in learning about the recreation and tourism industry or learning to expand your knowledge. To register or for additional information, contact the Busi- ness, Engineering and Industrial Technology Division at South- west Virginia Community Col- lege by calling 276.964.7277, by emailing beit@sw.edu or visiting httla://www.sw.edu/beit/. Baseball pre- season training Sportswise Sports & Per- formance Center will be offering a six week pre-season training program beginning January 5" for high school aged baseball players. Pitching and hitting instruction will be offered. For more information contact sportswiseoniine@gmail.com or [ I (2760 328"3300" Individual Classified advertising works...call 762-7671 softball hitting lessons also available. Close out holiday season with safety in mind Homes have been decorated, you that practicing safety now holiday decorations: gifts unwrapped and New Year's resolutions are ready to fill everyone's thoughts. With the onset of post-holiday activity, it's important to keep safety at top of mind. That's why the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL), an independent safety testing organization, are joining together this post-holiday season to remind consumers to practice safety as they put away holiday decorations. According to the NFPA, 13 percent of the home fu'es at- tributed to Christmas trees have occurred in January. The NFPA recommends consumers remove real trees from their home and properly dispose of them once their holiday celebration ends. Christmas trees - real or artificial - can be a significant fuel source if a f'lre occurs in your home. Even a well-watered tree should be taken down after four weeks. If you decorated your real tree right after Thank- sgiving, it should be discarded the week after Christmas. Christmas trees are not the only holiday decorations that need prompt attention after the holidays. All electric decorations should also be taken down and put away. Holiday lights are considered seasonal and should not be up longer than 90 days. If you leave decorations out any longer, they will be more prone to damage, which could cause an electrical shock or fire hazard. As you unplug and store holiday decorations, the NFPA and UL would like to remind can keep decorations in working condition and prevent potential hazards from occurring next year. Following are safety tips consumers can use any time (vhen putting away seasonal decorations: 1. To unplug electric decorations, use the gripping area provided on the plugs. Never pull the cord to unplug a device from electrical outlets. Doing so can damage the cord's wire and insulation and even lead to an electrical shock or fire. 2. As you're putting away electrical light strings,.take time to inspect each for flaws. Throw out light sets if they have loose connections, broken or cracked sockets or frayed or bare wires. 3. Do not place a faulty set of lights back into the storage box for next year's use. 4. Take the initiative now and throw out worn light strings. Shop for replacements during after-Christmas sales or add lights to your Christmas decoration list for next year. 5. Be sure to pack lights appropriately. No one likes to untangle a web of lights. When preparing your holiday lights for storage, consider purchasing a holiday light storage reel, or create your own system. 6. Store electrical decorations in a dry place, such as a suitcase, where they cannot be damaged by water or dampness. Also, keep them away from children and pets to ensure that cords and wires are not damaged in storage. Additionally, to preserve and ensure the longevity of your 1. Wrap each set of lights and put them in individual plastic bags, or wrap the lights around an empty wrapping paper tube or cardboard square. If you wrap the lights around a piece of cardboard, cut a slit in one side of the square. Thread the end of a set of lights through the slit. 'Wrap the lights around the cardboard, threading the other end back through the slit. 2. Although the box your artificial tree came in may seem like the perfect one to repack it in for storing, this isn't the wisest idea for preservation. The cardboard boxes begin to deteriorate making them more prone to insect infestation. 3. Special ornaments benefit from being stored in their original packaging. If you throw out the original box, store smaller ornaments in an egg carton. 4. Save yourself time next year by thoroughly labeling decorations before storing. Make a detailed inventory on the outside of each container. Number each to keep track of how many you have (for example, Box 1 of 12) and consider taping a piece of wrapping paper on the outside of each container for easy holiday storage identification. For more " information regarding holiday decorating safety, footage of how quickly a dry Christmas tree incinerates or photos related to holiday decoration safety, please visit the UL Newsroom web site at htt://www.ul.com/newsroom or the NFPA website at http://www.nfpa.org. Bell Nursery provides poinsettia Bell Nursery, the largest grower of plant material in the Mid-Atlantic and one of the largest growers in the nation, will move more than 1 million poinsettia plants in a dozen varieties of red, white and pink, through The Home Depot registers this holiday season. A tropical plant native to Mexico, the poinsettia was brought to the United States in 1825 by Joel Roberts Poinsett, the first United States Minister to Mexico. Since that time, the poinsettia has become one of the most popular holiday plants. Al- though, traditionally known for their bright red color, poinsettias come in a number of hues. This year, Bell Nursery has grown 12 unique designer poinsettia varie- ties such as "Visions of Grand- eur" and "Monet Twilight". With the holiday season fast approaching, Bell Nursery offers three simple tips to help your poinsettias look their best. Pick a healthy plant. The longevity of a poinsettia plant can be dependent on its pur- chased condition. Select a plant that has bright green leaves and colorful sturdy bracts. After returning home with the plant, remove its .protective covering and place m a location that receives indirect sunlight. Water the plant regularly. Practicing proper watering techniques is important to the survival of all plants. Poinsettias should be watered when the plant's soil is dry. A great way to water it is to take the plant to the sink, remove the foil wrapping and add water to the soil. The foil wrapping can be replaced, after the excess water has drained from the plant. The plant can also be placed in a saucer and the foil wrapping can be punctured at the bottom of the plant to allow drainage. Avoid direct sunlight. Be- cause poinsettias are tropical plants, they do require some sunlight. But, placing the plant care tips in direct sunlight can cause dam- age to the plant's leaves. Ex- treme low or high temperature and drafts should also be avoided. The belief that poinsettias are poisonous is a common miscon= ception. A number of organiza- tions, including Ohio State University, have documented that poinsettias are non-toxic and safe to be in homes where children and pets reside. As with many plants, poinsettias are not meant for ingestion and may cause discomfort if consumed. Poinsettias are wonderful additions to holiday d6cor; they also make great hostess gifts. Bell Nursery also offers a vat= iety of orchids, trees and d6cor-i ated shrubs that make perfect additions to any holiday celebra- tiori: For additional holiday dec- orating inspiration and images of Bell Nursery products available in The Home Depot stores visit Facebook.com/BellNursery or www.bellnursery.com CVTimes Deadlines: Editorial copy: birthdays, anniversaries, press releases, calendar items, reunions, etc 4 pm Monday Advertising: classified and display--12 noon Tuesday IFrom all of us -- a vertj Happtj New Year The Z013 Ford cars and trucks are arriving daily!! Buy one from Horgan HcClure Ford - It's the right thing to do! MORGAN McCLURE Saint Paul, VA morganmcclureford.com (276) 762-5535 ,,),, Everyone should have a plan. (.L1,,cr .\\; ,: Take the first step Talk to your family about what you would do in case of a terrorist attack or other emergency There's no reason not to To find out other things you can :io to be prepared, .org visit www readygov