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St. Paul , Virginia
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January 3, 2013     Clinch Valley Times
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Page 4 CLINCH VALLEY TIMES, St. Paul, VA, Thursday, January 3, 2013 SWCC offers plumbing QUILT WINNER. '.Amanda Austin was the winner of the quilt which was part ofa fundraiser held by the Friends of the J. Fred Matthews Memorial Library. Pictured here is her mother, Peggy Austin, accepting the quilt on Amanda,s behalf. New Year's resolutions for drivers Southwest Virginia Commun- ity College will offer an evening plumbing course during the spring 2013 semester. This is an entry level course focusing on the basic skills needed to work in the construction trades. Learn new skills or perfect existing skills to make you a more valuable employee and expand your employment opportunities. Plumbing is an important fun- ction for the home owner. The course offered spring semester teaches the basic concepts of plumbing, materials, equipment and proper techniques. This course is for you if you want to expand your skillset or just want to learn about plumbing for home improvement projects. To register or for additional information, contac.t the Busi- ness, Engineering and Industrial Technology Division at South- At this time of year, everyone hopes to close the book on bad habits and resoNe to do better. Experts agree that many people break their New Year's resolutions because they set unrealistic goals for themselves. However, there are common driving behaviors that drivers can resolve to improve, which are not only attainable but can make it a safer year for every- one. "Bad driving is often just a habit you get in to," said Ray Palermo, director of public rela- tions for Response Insurance "It can take as few as 21 days for people to adopt a new tatbit. So, drivers can help ensure that 2013 is safe for themselves and others on the road in a relative short period of time." He Offered a few New Year's Resolutions for drivers. Use your turn signals. Letting other drivers know where you are heading . avoids crashes. Stay calm. Don't compound another driver's foolish driving maneuver by making your own. Don't overreact to events that can lead to road rage. Know where you are going. And, if you do make a wrong turn, just keep going. More often than not, you can return to the correct road pretty quickly and do it without endangering others. * Maintain- your car. Check all fluid levels, change the oil if it's due, clean the car's windshield, windows and headlights, make sure your lights and directionals are working properly, check the tire tread and air pres- sure. Sleep. Rest can be yotnr best defensive driving wea- pon. Long hours behind thee wheel, particularly at High,t, make you drowsy, less alert to danger and increase your west Virginia Community Col- lege by calling 276.964.7277, by emailing beit@sw.edu or visiting http://www, sw.edu/beit/. Wise County Sheriff's Report The Wise County Sheriff's Office reports the following activities for the period of 12/17/2012 through 12/23/2012. Wise Central Dispatch received a total of 1,361 calls for this seven- day period. Of the total calls received 325 were dispatched to the Sheriff's Office. Total number of Domestic calls for this period was 4. Criminal Process for the same period served 3 Felony Warrants, 26 Misde- meanor Warrants, 0 DUI Arrest and worked 0 Traffic Accident. Civil process for this period served 392 Civil Papers. During HORSE AND SLEIGH...This light display, located on Wise Street, is always a cheerful sight to see when you go through town. 7 Free technology classes for adult learners to be offered beginning February; apply now -Regional Adult Ed and Mountain Empire Community College Team Up to Provide Training- ,.: The Regional Adult Edu- puters became common in the cation Program of Lee, Scott, workplace With this program Wise and Norton Public Schools we will help adults earn and announced a new program in build ,,pon their GED with partnership with Mountain Em- computer skills expected by pire Community College to employers. We get frequent calls provide free technology training from adults who need basic to a limited number of adult technology skills to get or keep learners. The program, Plugged- their job. This program is in InVA IT, is designed to provide response to these calls." students the technology skills The coursework will be rig- sought by area employers and is orous, and successful applicants free of charge to those eligible will be committing to classes "So many jobs now require a three evenings each week from knowledge of technology, what mid February to early June. employers refer to as "IT" or Adults will complete the pro- information technology," stated gram with industry-recognized Jam Stallard, PluggedlnVA IT credentials that will prepare Coordinator. "Many local adults them for better jobs and higher GED if neded, Microsoft ITd certifications and 12 credit hours.: from MECC toward an IT Read-:! iness Career Studies Certificate. ,, Applications are being taken, now, and space is limited. Interested individuals are urged: to call 877 RACE 2 GED (877.7223243) or e-mail Jan Stallard at ' j stallard@race2GED.org. :, In addition, the Regional', Adult Education Program offers, free Adult Education classes:;, throughout the region to prepare students for the GED Exam. : For details call Amy at 877, RACE 2 GED (877.722.3243) or : in Scott County 386.2433 or go : left the classroom before com- Students willearn a to www.race2ged.org. this seven-day period 6 wages, i additinal Criminal Investi" G d vt getstarted cutt-i back ' gations were initiated and 13 OO wa00s .o ng . were cleared by arrest. The Sheriff's Office provided 180 channels.-- The bottom line: Cutting response time. Stop multi-tasking. Eat- ing, reading and talking on a cell phone (even hands-free) while driving are distracting. Never drink and drive. And, be alert for drivers who may not be a safe as you. Get an emergency kit. A first aid kit should minimally include bandages, tape, wash and dry cloth and a topical antiseptic. A car kit should include oil, anti- freeze, fi'ansmiSsion and brake fluid, basic tools, signal flare, flashlight (with fully charged batteries) and duct tape. Additional information on this and other car and home- owner topics is available at the Response Insurance Safety Information Center: www.response.com/safety. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available, Financial Aid if qualified, SCHEV authorized. Call 888-354-9917 www.CenturaOnline.com man-hours of Court Room Security for the three courts and the courthouse. The Sheriff's Office tran- sported 0 adult in state, 0 adult out of state, 0 mental patient, and 1 juveniles for a total of 1 transports, involving 4 hours.. The Sheriff's Office unlocked 13 vehicles and escorted 6 funerals during this seven-day period. Official Practice Test on-demand The Regional Adult Edu- cation Program of Lee, Scott & Norton Public Schools will offer the Official Practice Test (OPT) on-demand at any of our summer classes. Those locations are in Lee County at the Jonesville Adult Learning Center on. Tuesday and Thursday from 9 am until noon. In Scott County at the Gate City Learning Center on Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 am until noon. In Wise County at the Wise Adult Learning Center on Tuesday and Thursday from It's always smart to control your spending. But if you or others in your family are facing difficult times financially, per- haps from a job loss or wage cuts, it is especially important to spend less so you can have more money to pay essential bills or to add to a savings account you can tap in an emergency. Here are some strategies. Take a serious look at your spending. As a first step, think about creating a spending plan, commonlyknown as-a budget. Make a list of your monthly expenses divided into two groups.-- your "needs" and your "wants." The needs are expenses that are absolutely necessary, such as your housing, utilities, clothes, food and transportation. The wants are optional purchases. "After you differentiate between spending for needs and splurging on wants, cut back on the second category, especially if you're already suffering an in- come loss or other financial hard- ship," said Luke W. Reynolds, Chief of the FDIC's Community But also consider oppor- back on an already tight budget/. tunities to save on your neces- may seem daunting, but you can sides. Examples from experts and consumers alike: Try car- pooling or taking public trans- portation to work instead of driving by yourself. If you have multiple cars, see if you can live without one of them. Ask yourself if you really need those $200 sneakers or if a less expensive pair will do just free: Buy used instead of new. Take better care of what you buy so it will last longer. And, make your own coffee at home and bring your lunch to work instead of eating out. Finally, dont use your cre- dit cards or other loan products to buy things you really can't afford. Keep banking costs down. "Look at the most costly fees and recurring charges on your bank and credit card statements and consider how you can reduce or eliminate them," Reynolds said. Among the possibilities: If you routinely pay bank fees, shop for a different account that meets Centura COLLEGE 5:30 pm until 8:30 pm. Affairs Outreach Section. He For more information call said possible places to cut back 877 RACE 2 GED on unnecessary spending include (877.722.3243) or go to restaurant meals, monthly sub- _wwwLra_ce2ged.org. " ........ script!ons and premium TV Visit the job fair to learn of training opportunities designed to prepare you for a job in the telecommunications industry. Training in - basic computer operations ,, customer service interviewing skills and much more at the Southwest Virginia Technology Development Center. I = j ; I,;,/,/,,,,,,,,,/:,,:,,,/;,. ,. h,,,,,.: t, J'-,.Uk,ltY :,i,, T t C;W00 W RV. R0, Box 939, Lebanon VA a " Visit: WLRV.com . Phone: 889-1 380 Fax: 889-1388 138o AM your needs at a lower cost. Also review your banking habits to cut unnecessary fees. For example, use your own bank's ATMs for cash withdrawals instead of going elsewhere and paying a surcharge, and keep close tabs on your checking account balance to avoid bounced checks, which can be costly. Likewise, ask your credit card lender to consider lowering your interest rate, particularly if you have a relatively good pay- ment history and could qualify for a lower rate elsewhere. Also pay as much as you can as soon as you can. It will mean you'll : pay less interest and avoid late fees. And if you have a mortgage and you expect to continue to own your home for the foreseeable future, see if you can save money by ref'mancing to get a lower interest rate and a lower monthly payment after also weighing the up-front costs of refinancing. "Ref'mancing your mortgage or auto loan can save you money over the coming years that you can put to better use in a savings account or paying off other debt," said Mary Bass, FDIC Senior Community Affairs Specialist. Be careful before cutting insurance coverage. It's im- portant to have adequate insur- ance, especially for life, health, disability, personal liability, and , coverage of property. "While it's a good idea to review your insurance coverage every year or so and not carry more coverage than necessary, think twice before trying to save money by dropping insurance coverage," added Bass. "All it takes is one illness or auto accident to realize the importance of having ade- quate insurance." find ways to spend less without sacrificing your quality of life. For more ideas on ways to cut spending, see articles in back issues of FDIC Consumer News online at www.fdic.gov/consumernews, as ;/ well as tips from "66 Ways to ,. Save" at www.66ways.org. ,.1., ! Deadline for [ "-" classifieds is ] :.i Tuesday noon! ;' ?'1  J 4iZ ,# \\; Page 4 CLINCH VALLEY TIMES, St. Paul, VA, Thursday, January 3, 2013 SWCC offers plumbing QUILT WINNER. '.Amanda Austin was the winner of the quilt which was part ofa fundraiser held by the Friends of the J. Fred Matthews Memorial Library. Pictured here is her mother, Peggy Austin, accepting the quilt on Amanda,s behalf. New Year's resolutions for drivers Southwest Virginia Commun- ity College will offer an evening plumbing course during the spring 2013 semester. This is an entry level course focusing on the basic skills needed to work in the construction trades. Learn new skills or perfect existing skills to make you a more valuable employee and expand your employment opportunities. Plumbing is an important fun- ction for the home owner. The course offered spring semester teaches the basic concepts of plumbing, materials, equipment and proper techniques. This course is for you if you want to expand your skillset or just want to learn about plumbing for home improvement projects. To register or for additional information, contac.t the Busi- ness, Engineering and Industrial Technology Division at South- At this time of year, everyone hopes to close the book on bad habits and resoNe to do better. Experts agree that many people break their New Year's resolutions because they set unrealistic goals for themselves. However, there are common driving behaviors that drivers can resolve to improve, which are not only attainable but can make it a safer year for every- one. "Bad driving is often just a habit you get in to," said Ray Palermo, director of public rela- tions for Response Insurance "It can take as few as 21 days for people to adopt a new tatbit. So, drivers can help ensure that 2013 is safe for themselves and others on the road in a relative short period of time." He Offered a few New Year's Resolutions for drivers. Use your turn signals. Letting other drivers know where you are heading . avoids crashes. Stay calm. Don't compound another driver's foolish driving maneuver by making your own. Don't overreact to events that can lead to road rage. Know where you are going. And, if you do make a wrong turn, just keep going. More often than not, you can return to the correct road pretty quickly and do it without endangering others. * Maintain- your car. Check all fluid levels, change the oil if it's due, clean the car's windshield, windows and headlights, make sure your lights and directionals are working properly, check the tire tread and air pres- sure. Sleep. Rest can be yotnr best defensive driving wea- pon. Long hours behind thee wheel, particularly at High,t, make you drowsy, less alert to danger and increase your west Virginia Community Col- lege by calling 276.964.7277, by emailing beit@sw.edu or visiting http://www, sw.edu/beit/. Wise County Sheriff's Report The Wise County Sheriff's Office reports the following activities for the period of 12/17/2012 through 12/23/2012. Wise Central Dispatch received a total of 1,361 calls for this seven- day period. Of the total calls received 325 were dispatched to the Sheriff's Office. Total number of Domestic calls for this period was 4. Criminal Process for the same period served 3 Felony Warrants, 26 Misde- meanor Warrants, 0 DUI Arrest and worked 0 Traffic Accident. Civil process for this period served 392 Civil Papers. During HORSE AND SLEIGH...This light display, located on Wise Street, is always a cheerful sight to see when you go through town. 7 Free technology classes for adult learners to be offered beginning February; apply now -Regional Adult Ed and Mountain Empire Community College Team Up to Provide Training- ,.: The Regional Adult Edu- puters became common in the cation Program of Lee, Scott, workplace With this program Wise and Norton Public Schools we will help adults earn and announced a new program in build ,,pon their GED with partnership with Mountain Em- computer skills expected by pire Community College to employers. We get frequent calls provide free technology training from adults who need basic to a limited number of adult technology skills to get or keep learners. The program, Plugged- their job. This program is in InVA IT, is designed to provide response to these calls." students the technology skills The coursework will be rig- sought by area employers and is orous, and successful applicants free of charge to those eligible will be committing to classes "So many jobs now require a three evenings each week from knowledge of technology, what mid February to early June. employers refer to as "IT" or Adults will complete the pro- information technology," stated gram with industry-recognized Jam Stallard, PluggedlnVA IT credentials that will prepare Coordinator. "Many local adults them for better jobs and higher GED if neded, Microsoft ITd certifications and 12 credit hours.: from MECC toward an IT Read-:! iness Career Studies Certificate. ,, Applications are being taken, now, and space is limited. Interested individuals are urged: to call 877 RACE 2 GED (877.7223243) or e-mail Jan Stallard at ' j stallard@race2GED.org. :, In addition, the Regional', Adult Education Program offers, free Adult Education classes:;, throughout the region to prepare students for the GED Exam. : For details call Amy at 877, RACE 2 GED (877.722.3243) or : in Scott County 386.2433 or go : left the classroom before com- Students willearn a to www.race2ged.org. this seven-day period 6 wages, i additinal Criminal Investi" G d vt getstarted cutt-i back ' gations were initiated and 13 OO wa00s .o ng . were cleared by arrest. The Sheriff's Office provided 180 channels.-- The bottom line: Cutting response time. Stop multi-tasking. Eat- ing, reading and talking on a cell phone (even hands-free) while driving are distracting. Never drink and drive. And, be alert for drivers who may not be a safe as you. Get an emergency kit. A first aid kit should minimally include bandages, tape, wash and dry cloth and a topical antiseptic. A car kit should include oil, anti- freeze, fi'ansmiSsion and brake fluid, basic tools, signal flare, flashlight (with fully charged batteries) and duct tape. Additional information on this and other car and home- owner topics is available at the Response Insurance Safety Information Center: www.response.com/safety. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available, Financial Aid if qualified, SCHEV authorized. Call 888-354-9917 www.CenturaOnline.com man-hours of Court Room Security for the three courts and the courthouse. The Sheriff's Office tran- sported 0 adult in state, 0 adult out of state, 0 mental patient, and 1 juveniles for a total of 1 transports, involving 4 hours.. The Sheriff's Office unlocked 13 vehicles and escorted 6 funerals during this seven-day period. Official Practice Test on-demand The Regional Adult Edu- cation Program of Lee, Scott & Norton Public Schools will offer the Official Practice Test (OPT) on-demand at any of our summer classes. Those locations are in Lee County at the Jonesville Adult Learning Center on. Tuesday and Thursday from 9 am until noon. In Scott County at the Gate City Learning Center on Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 am until noon. In Wise County at the Wise Adult Learning Center on Tuesday and Thursday from It's always smart to control your spending. But if you or others in your family are facing difficult times financially, per- haps from a job loss or wage cuts, it is especially important to spend less so you can have more money to pay essential bills or to add to a savings account you can tap in an emergency. Here are some strategies. Take a serious look at your spending. As a first step, think about creating a spending plan, commonlyknown as-a budget. Make a list of your monthly expenses divided into two groups.-- your "needs" and your "wants." The needs are expenses that are absolutely necessary, such as your housing, utilities, clothes, food and transportation. The wants are optional purchases. "After you differentiate between spending for needs and splurging on wants, cut back on the second category, especially if you're already suffering an in- come loss or other financial hard- ship," said Luke W. Reynolds, Chief of the FDIC's Community But also consider oppor- back on an already tight budget/. tunities to save on your neces- may seem daunting, but you can sides. Examples from experts and consumers alike: Try car- pooling or taking public trans- portation to work instead of driving by yourself. If you have multiple cars, see if you can live without one of them. Ask yourself if you really need those $200 sneakers or if a less expensive pair will do just free: Buy used instead of new. Take better care of what you buy so it will last longer. And, make your own coffee at home and bring your lunch to work instead of eating out. Finally, dont use your cre- dit cards or other loan products to buy things you really can't afford. Keep banking costs down. "Look at the most costly fees and recurring charges on your bank and credit card statements and consider how you can reduce or eliminate them," Reynolds said. Among the possibilities: If you routinely pay bank fees, shop for a different account that meets Centura COLLEGE 5:30 pm until 8:30 pm. Affairs Outreach Section. He For more information call said possible places to cut back 877 RACE 2 GED on unnecessary spending include (877.722.3243) or go to restaurant meals, monthly sub- _wwwLra_ce2ged.org. " ........ script!ons and premium TV Visit the job fair to learn of training opportunities designed to prepare you for a job in the telecommunications industry. Training in - basic computer operations ,, customer service interviewing skills and much more at the Southwest Virginia Technology Development Center. I = j ; I,;,/,/,,,,,,,,,/:,,:,,,/;,. ,. h,,,,,.: t, J'-,.Uk,ltY :,i,, T t C;W00 W RV. R0, Box 939, Lebanon VA a " Visit: WLRV.com . Phone: 889-1 380 Fax: 889-1388 138o AM your needs at a lower cost. Also review your banking habits to cut unnecessary fees. For example, use your own bank's ATMs for cash withdrawals instead of going elsewhere and paying a surcharge, and keep close tabs on your checking account balance to avoid bounced checks, which can be costly. Likewise, ask your credit card lender to consider lowering your interest rate, particularly if you have a relatively good pay- ment history and could qualify for a lower rate elsewhere. Also pay as much as you can as soon as you can. It will mean you'll : pay less interest and avoid late fees. And if you have a mortgage and you expect to continue to own your home for the foreseeable future, see if you can save money by ref'mancing to get a lower interest rate and a lower monthly payment after also weighing the up-front costs of refinancing. "Ref'mancing your mortgage or auto loan can save you money over the coming years that you can put to better use in a savings account or paying off other debt," said Mary Bass, FDIC Senior Community Affairs Specialist. Be careful before cutting insurance coverage. It's im- portant to have adequate insur- ance, especially for life, health, disability, personal liability, and , coverage of property. "While it's a good idea to review your insurance coverage every year or so and not carry more coverage than necessary, think twice before trying to save money by dropping insurance coverage," added Bass. "All it takes is one illness or auto accident to realize the importance of having ade- quate insurance." find ways to spend less without sacrificing your quality of life. For more ideas on ways to cut spending, see articles in back issues of FDIC Consumer News online at www.fdic.gov/consumernews, as ;/ well as tips from "66 Ways to ,. Save" at www.66ways.org. ,.1., ! Deadline for [ "-" classifieds is ] :.i Tuesday noon! ;' ?'1  J 4iZ ,# \