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St. Paul , Virginia
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January 3, 2013     Clinch Valley Times
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/ Clinch Valley Time s F i ImE/ 005.2- mOnTH; " , S i " 'The time has come,' the walrus said, 'to talk of many things , ' " ,,=.___ ._=.5_s_0..c_=...._/oN___:j Voi. LV, No. 1 : Thursday, January 3, 2013 Saint Paul, Virginia 5Oe NEW SIGN...As part of the Downtown Revitalization Project, a new sign has been installed at the Historic Hillman House located across from the Farmer's Market. The sign was made and installed by Jerry's Signs. Ten tips to prepare your house for winter The winter chill has arrived, system. Then close-them at night Install a programmable ther- so take a little time to prepare the home for cooler days before the furnace breaks down. "More than half the energy used at home can be used by the heating and air conditioning system," said Billy Bartlett, owner of the Aire Serv of Wise to reduce the winter chill, mostat. This "smart thermostat" Monitor Monthly. Check -can turn on the heater to the the furnace filters monthly and desired set point one hour before replace as necessary, you arrive, avoiding the need to Insulate the Air Ducts. A run the system all da,. There are heat and air conditioning even smart phone apps that can system's efficiency can improve connect to many programmable up to 20 percent when ducts are thermostats. County. "Regular maintenance is properly sealed and insulated. the best way to cut costs and They can help prevent the heated keep your heating system work- ing at maximum efficiency." To prevent unwanted costs and keep your heating system in excellent condition this winter, homeowners can follow these tips. Don't Get Drafty. Look for air from escaping into unheated spaces such as the attic or crawlspace. Avoid Faulty Readings. Keep heat-generated appliances like TVs and computer equip- ment away from thermostats. Reverse Ceiling Fans. By Optimize your heating sys- tem's air flow. A contractor can test air flow and make adjust- ments for optimal ,performance, which increases comfort levels while reducing utility bills. If your heater or furnace is outdated, you'll save money by upgrading. An Energy Star rated gas furnace can be 15 percent drafty windows and door frames. Check the caulking and add new weather stripping as necessary - air leaks can cause the loss of : heat, energy and money. Get a Check-Up. Identify problems early with a seasonal check-up by your heating arid cooling contractor. Dirt and neglect are the main cause for heating system failures. Open Up. Open your south- switching the ceiling fan blades to the clockwise direction, warmer air that's accumulated near the ceiling will be pushed back down. Other tips... Message fro the l00,Iayor As we close out the year of 2012, I would like to take this opportunity to look back and recognize that we have achieved many of our goals we set for this past year, and talk about our future plans. The Farmers Market has expanded, and with the addition of the new structure, the market is now a major attraction for our local shoppers from Russell, Wise, Dickenson,. and Scott counties. The Farmers Market Committee can be proud of their accomplishments in 2012. Another planned addition for long term use is the Blue Belle Island, Clinch River, and Sugar Hill Loop trail. We are closer every day to putting the trail online. With good weather in the spring, both the walking and bike trails should be ready to open. The Town of St. Paul experienced a tragic fire in the Stonebriar Apartments this year, which resulted in one death. One of the issues arising from this horrific event is the need to improve and shorten emergency response time between emer- gency services from Wise, Russell, and Dickenson counties. In that respect, a joint resolution was passed that allows all emer- gency crews to respond to any emergency call in the area. This action will define responsibility and hasten the response time without interference. Two other major activities that involve St. Paul and the surrounding area are Clinch River Days and our Christmas Bazaar. Both events have had increasing success each year. The committees for both events start planning immediately for the next year and we should appreciated the hard work in organizing and planning these annual events. I would also like to thank all of the organizations that participated in the Christ- mas Parade, as well as Guy White for leading the parade and carrying the national colors and both Castlewood and Eastiside marching bands for the wonder- ful music they provided. Catching the cow by Jerry Couch The history article I'm currently working on is taking a while to finish. In the meantime here's a story of life in South St. Paul on Couch Hill to entertain you. Many of you have also experienced this vanished Way of life, once so common. When I was a boy, Uncle Dule Couch always kept one or two Jersey cows. These cows supplied both his family and ours with dairy products. Aunt Edith milked those cows each more efficient than older models morning and evening. She and reduce the amount of processed the milk and made greenhouse gasses emitted. A butter from the cream. The qualified boiler can be up to 5 , butter was a rich yellow color, percent more efficient than with plenty of salt added for standard models. flavor, Aunt Edith mde her butter with pride and skill. The Celebrate music at T'_ __ tlngs 00napel butter pats were very firm when Rings Chapel Baptist Church begins at 7:00 p.m. on January 6. chilled, almost too firm to cut of Castlewood would like to The church is located just off with anything but the sharpest invite the publ'ic to come Route 58 on Memorial Drive, knife. facing window blinds and celebrate the music ministry of Castlewood. For more informa- curtains to let the sun in and reduce the load on your heating Kelly Nelson Mullins. Service tion please call 276-762-0396.  : : :=:= " Z ....................................................................................... "N III ITI--I1 Calendar of events... AA-Sundays and Tuesdays.'-Big needed-training available. Call 1- ...The"/ise County School Board Stone Gap, 8 pm, Episcopal Church. Wednesdays: Wise, 8 pro, Trinity United Methodist Church• Fridays: Clintwood, 7:30 pro, Clintwood United Methodist Church. COPPER CREEK ELEMENT- ARY PTA-3rd Monday, 7 pm school cafeteria. ST, PAUL IDA BOARD-Fourth Mondays, 6 pm, St. Paul Town Hall. ST. PAUL TOWN COUNCIL- Third Mondays, 6 pm, Town Hall. CASTLEWOOD W&SA-The Castlewood Water & Sewage Authority Board of Directors, 6 pm second Mondays. ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT- First Tuesday, 1 pro, Appalachian Agency for Senior Citizens office, Claypool Hill. Free. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS- Tuesdays and Saturdays, 8 pm Presbyterian Church, Norton. CASTLEWOOD LODGE #231- Stated meetings will be held the third Saturday of each month. The School of Instruction will be held on fourth Thursdays at 7. ST. PAUL LODGE #343-Second Thursdays, 7:30 pm, Stated Com-. munication; First Thursday, 7 pm School of Instruction. VFW POST #8652, DAV UHAPTER 12-4th Tuesday, 7 m, VFW, Riverview, Coeburn. NEIGHBORS AID-Thursdays, 9:30 to 12. St. Therese's Neigh- bors Aid Building, new & used clothing for sale. RUSSELL CO. BOARD OF SUPERVISORS-First Monday, 6 pm, Lebanon. 'CLINCHFIELD LODGE #256- Stated Communication, 1st Satur- days, 7:30; School of Instruction third Thursdays, 7 pm RECOVERY GROUP-The Wise County Mental Health Center conducts a recovery group for sub- stance abusers and families Fridays at 10 am Call 276-679- 0810. ACOA MEETING-Adult Chil- dren of Alcoholics meet Mondays, 7 pm, First Baptist Church, Coeburn. Call 762-0016, 276-395- 6588 or 276-679-7371. LITTLE LEAGUE-The Clinch River Little League Board meet at 4 pm third Sundays at the UMWA Building in Castlewood. All interested persons are invited to attend. H.O.P.E. HOUSE-H.O.P.E. Hou- se provides emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence in Wise, Russell, Dickenson,' Lee, Scott and Buchanan counties and the City of Norton. Volunteers 800-572-2278. maintains a Policy Manual which SENIOR CITIZENS-The Castle- is available to the public in the wood Senior Citizens meet at 10 library of each schobl and in each am Wednesdays at the Castlewood county public library. Lions Den. Anyone 60 or over is ,,,Copies of the Russell County invited. School Board Policy Manual have The Dante Senior Citizens meet been placed in the office and the each Monday and Tuesday at 10 library of each school, and at the am at the Dante Fire Department. Russell County Public Library. Russell County residents 60 or SUPPORT GROUP-Women older are invited, survivors of sexual assault are RUSSELL CO LIBRARY-Hours invited to attend Clinch Valley at the Russell COunty Public Communication Action, Library, Lebanon, are M/Tu 9am- Inc./Family Crisis Services' sup- 7pm, W/F 9am-5:30pm, Th 9am- port group meeting with victims of 8pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Sun 2-5pm. similar situations Mondays, 10:30 MATTHEWS LIBRARY-Hours am-12 noon. For information call at the J. Fred Matthews Memorial Rande Hackler, 276-988-5583 or Library, St. Patti, are 9am-5pm RanettaDavis, 276-889-8206. Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays/Sat FREE ADULT ED-Free adult urdays, and I lam-7:30pm Tues- education classes are available in days and Thursdays. See Library Lee, Scott and Wise counties and for special program schedules, the City of Norton. Daytime and DICKENSON-BUNDY-The evening classes for adults who Dickenson-Bundy Log House is want to improve their basic skills. open weekly Thursdays through Instructors also assist adults with Saturdays, 10-3, and'Sundays 12-4 job-related skills including re- pm. sume, writing and interviewing. SOCIAL SECURITY-The Wise For details, call 1-800-422-3433 or Social Security Office is open 276-386-2433. Mondays-Fridays from 9am-4pm. TRANSPORTATION-The Ap- Phone numbers are 1-800-772- palachian Agency for Senior Citi- 1213 or 276-679-7633. zens provides disability transport- LIBRARY FRIENDS-Friends of ation services in Buchanan, the J. Fred Matthews Memorial Dickenson, Russell and Tazewell Library, St. Paul meet at the counties to individuals with Library on first Thursdays at 4 pro. disabilities, regardless of.age. Call VFW POST 9864-VFW Post 1-888-656-2272. 9864, Lebanon, welcomes new GENEALOGY GROUP-The members. If you served overseas Russell County Genealogy Group during any war, write VFW Post meets 5:30 pm first Thursdays, 9864, P.O. Box 1419, Lebanon, Russell County Public Library, VA 24266 and send name, address, Lebanon. The Group purpose is and phone number. Transfers "to learn, to share and to welcomed, perpetuate family history." Call HEALTH SERVICES-The Wise William T. Fuller, 276-623-3410 County Health Department, Wise, or fullerjr1942.yahoo.com is open from 8am-8pm first JOIN THE FRIENDS-Join the Thursdays. Clinics will be offered Friends of J. Fred Matthews Mere- in family planning, pediatrics, orial Library and help promote the school and adult physicals, WIC, improvement of facilities and Paps and immunizations. Ap- services of the library. Send name, pointments are necessary for all address and phone number, with a but immunizations. For an $5 membership gift, to J. Fred appointment, call 762-328-8000. Matthews Memorial Library, P.O. FACILITIES AVAILABLE-The Box 1976, St. Paul, VA 24283. Tacoma Community Center is Make checks payable to Friends 6f available for reunions, birthdays the J. Fred Matthews Mmorial and shov*ers. All proceeds Library. rehabilitate the Tacoma School as EASTERN STAR-Clinch Valley a Community Ccuter. For infor- Chapter #152, Order of Eastern marion, call 395-6398. Star, meets each fourth Tuesday, 100 TM BIRTHDAY-Appalachian except for March and December, Agency for Senior Citizens when the meetings are on the recognizes persons in Russell, second Tuesday. All meetings are Dickenson, Buchanan and Taze- at 7:30 p.m. well counties who are 100 )'ears VETERANS' CLAIMS-Dicken- old or Nder. Call Dana Collins, I- son County-Oscar Silcox helps file 800-656-2272, to'advise AASC of veterans' claims. For appointment, any upcoming 100 th birthday, call 276-835-8847 nights. SCHOOL POLICIES Coeburn-'A Dept. of Veterans Services representative will assist clients and answer questions at the Coeburn VFW Post from 9am- Church and church-related activities 3:30 pm third Thursdays except June. FOOD BANK-First Baptist Church, St. Paul, operates a Food Bank each Tuesday from 9-11 am at the church. Donations are welcomed. All in need of food are welcome. COMMUNITY CENTER-The West Dante Community Center meets at 7 pm first Mondays. For more information please call 495- 8473. CLOTHES CLOSET-The Wom- en On Mission group at First Baptist Church, St. Paul, opens a Clothes Closet from 9-11 am Tuesdays. Anyone who needs clothing is welcome• FREE HIV TESTING-Health Departments in the Lenowisco Health District offer free confid- ential HIV testing throughout the year. For information, call Wise County 318-8000; Lee Co. Health Dept. 276-346-2011;" or Scott Co. Health Dept. 276-386-1312. FREE GED CLASSES-Free GED classes are offered at the Oxbow Family Investment Center, St. Paul, Mondays and Wed- nesdays from 8:30 am-12 noon. Glenna McReynolds is the teacher. Call 1-800-422-3433. GED ONLINE-The Regional Adult Education Program is offering flee GED Classes online. This service is for qualifying and adult learners, with or without their own home computers, in Lee, Scott and Wise counties and the City of Norton. For more information, call GED Online Coordinator Marci Gore, 1-800- 422-3433 (in Scott County 386- 243"3). GED TESTING-GED Testing is available Monday through Thursday and on Saturdays at the Wise Co. Alternative Education Center, Wise. Call 276-328-8612 for information concerning GED testing. IN CONTROL PROGRAMS-In Control, a free diabetes program, meets at Oxbow Center, St. Paul, nd 5-6 pm 2 Mondays. DANTE LIVES ON-The Dante Lives On Board meets at 6:00 pm d Y Tuesdays at the Dante Museum with the Community Meeting following at 7:00 pro. GOSPEL SINGING-A Gospel Singing will be held at 7 pm the first Friday of each month at The Celebration Center, 16607 Broad Street, St. Paul. All are welcome - admission is free. BOOK DISCUSSION-Book Discussion Group One of the J. Fred Matthews Memorial Library meets fourth Thursdays (except November and December are combined in early December) at the Riverside Diner at 6 pro. calendar on page 3 One of the cows providing this wonderful milk and butter • was Old Pet, a black Jersey heifer. She was a very smart cow. Using her horns, she would open the barn door and go inside to patiently wait for milking time. She even endured letting us kids ride on her back. She was bred regularly so that she would remain "fresh," in other words, give milk. Her calves were sold because they weren't rleeded on the farm. Finally, Old Pet developed a health problem and could no longer produce milk. She was taken to the market and sold (a small farm is a model for pragmatism). A replacement cow was purchased. We named her Jewel because she had a diamond-shaped white spot on her forehead. Jewel showed none of the thoughtful charact- eristics of her predecessor. She was neither gentle nor patient. She often kicked the milk bucket over or failed to show up at milking time and had to be fetched. Jewel had a mean streak and a special dislike reserved for dogs. Perhaps this was genetic for she passed these traits to her calf, a heifer we never got around to naming. The birth of this calf was the start of trouble although we didn't know if at the time. She was verv olavful and followed my cousin Roger and me around like a pet dog, delighting in attention. My father and Uncle Dule noticed this and told us not to make a pet of the calf; that cows were farm animals, not pets. Naturally we disregarded this advice. The sweet calf that ran down the hill to meet us when we got home from school soon grew into a large cow. She continued to run excitedly down the hill at top speed to join us, only now we wondered if she would be able to stop before she bowled us into the river. To make matters worse, she decided she was "herd leader." She would sneak up behind us and butt us with her head, sending us sprawling. We weren't supposed to hit the cG-v but her attacks were The Main Street and Down. town Rehabilitation Committee continue to reflect commendable progress for our downtown area. We ended 2012 with some visible changes starting to take place, such as awnings, new facades, storefront painting anc cleanup. As we enter into 2013 we will see the facade work be completed by late summer. Th Willis Building will receive facelifi and we will constantl) be presenting this building tc contractors as an investment in the future downtown business expansion tying into tourism and canoeing, overnight lodging, and permanent apartments. St. Paul is fortunate that most of this work is supposed by grants. We hope to expand this source ot revenue and other efforts te continue improvement to the downtown area. As mayor, I hope to work with the Town Council to review the plans to redesign the A. R. Matthews Park to better allocate our resources and update the ?Continued on page 2)- Couch Hill Barn & Blacksmith Shop ca. 1948 escalating so we had to do something. Usually, after a quick look around to see if Uncle Dule was watching, we would whack her with a tree limb or thump her with rocks. She eventually got the message but her feelings were hurt. She became hostile and wary. We had taught her to think she was one of us and now she con- firmed the truth of Uncle Dule's warning about pet cows. We were getting our education the hard wly. The cow no longer confined her bad behavior to Roger and me. She terrorized my mother, who was afraid of most animals. The cow would wait for my mother at the garden gate then chase her. My mother would take refuge among the com- ponents of a rusting pile of junk beside the farm shop. The cow would lower her head and shake her horns menacingly. My mother, cowering in the junk- pile, would utter ineffective commands such as "Shooo!" and "Get away from here right now!" The cow would stand her ground, unimpressed, stomping her front hooves and snorting. Watching this scenario from the porch, my father would roll his eyes then look at me and say, "Go rescue your mother." This was when I became convinced that cows can laugh. One hot summer afternoon the cow didn't show up at milk- ing timel This was n o surprise It was one of her favorite tricks. Roger went to look for her. He found her standing in the cool. shade of a paw-paw thicket lo- cated above our vegetable gar- den. She was chewing idly and swishing her tail - the picture of docile, bovine innocence. Roger had brought a rope in case the cow decided not to cooperate. He quickly slipped the rope over her head before she realized what was hap- pening. He could tell she didn't like this but she began walking along the path toward the barn peacefully enough. After a few minutes, Roger let his guard down. Sensing her opportunity, the cow bolted. The rope zipped• painfully through Roger's hands. The cow galloped along the path ahead, the rope around her neck trailing in the dust behind her. Suddenly the cow stepped on the rope. Her head was violently jerked to the ground between her front legs but her body kept moving. Roger had a fleeting view of four hooves in the air as the cow was flung head-over- heels. She landed on her back in a cloud of dust with an audible "OOOOFffl" The breath had been knocked out of her. In panic, Roger thought, "Oh no! She's DEAD! I've killed Daddy's cow!" Roger ran up the path to see if the cow was alive. She lay there on the ground a moment, stunned and breathless. Finally her body shuddered as she sucked kn a great gulp of air. Roger grabbed the rope once more. The cow struggled to her feet. Much humbled, she pro- ceeded along the path. She was probably thinking "How did he DO that?" Eventually, both cows were sold. Times had changed and no one kept cows for domestic pur- poses anymore. Our milk was purchased in cartons and the homemade butter was replaced by margarine in packages. My son was four years old before he even realized milk came from cows, not gallon plastic jugs. Old Pet, Jewel, and her daughter have passed into memory; where they chew their cud and their breath smells like grass... / Clinch Valley Time s F i ImE/ 005.2- mOnTH; " , S i " 'The time has come,' the walrus said, 'to talk of many things , ' " ,,=.___ ._=.5_s_0..c_=...._/oN___:j Voi. LV, No. 1 : Thursday, January 3, 2013 Saint Paul, Virginia 5Oe NEW SIGN...As part of the Downtown Revitalization Project, a new sign has been installed at the Historic Hillman House located across from the Farmer's Market. The sign was made and installed by Jerry's Signs. Ten tips to prepare your house for winter The winter chill has arrived, system. Then close-them at night Install a programmable ther- so take a little time to prepare the home for cooler days before the furnace breaks down. "More than half the energy used at home can be used by the heating and air conditioning system," said Billy Bartlett, owner of the Aire Serv of Wise to reduce the winter chill, mostat. This "smart thermostat" Monitor Monthly. Check -can turn on the heater to the the furnace filters monthly and desired set point one hour before replace as necessary, you arrive, avoiding the need to Insulate the Air Ducts. A run the system all da,. There are heat and air conditioning even smart phone apps that can system's efficiency can improve connect to many programmable up to 20 percent when ducts are thermostats. County. "Regular maintenance is properly sealed and insulated. the best way to cut costs and They can help prevent the heated keep your heating system work- ing at maximum efficiency." To prevent unwanted costs and keep your heating system in excellent condition this winter, homeowners can follow these tips. Don't Get Drafty. Look for air from escaping into unheated spaces such as the attic or crawlspace. Avoid Faulty Readings. Keep heat-generated appliances like TVs and computer equip- ment away from thermostats. Reverse Ceiling Fans. By Optimize your heating sys- tem's air flow. A contractor can test air flow and make adjust- ments for optimal ,performance, which increases comfort levels while reducing utility bills. If your heater or furnace is outdated, you'll save money by upgrading. An Energy Star rated gas furnace can be 15 percent drafty windows and door frames. Check the caulking and add new weather stripping as necessary - air leaks can cause the loss of : heat, energy and money. Get a Check-Up. Identify problems early with a seasonal check-up by your heating arid cooling contractor. Dirt and neglect are the main cause for heating system failures. Open Up. Open your south- switching the ceiling fan blades to the clockwise direction, warmer air that's accumulated near the ceiling will be pushed back down. Other tips... Message fro the l00,Iayor As we close out the year of 2012, I would like to take this opportunity to look back and recognize that we have achieved many of our goals we set for this past year, and talk about our future plans. The Farmers Market has expanded, and with the addition of the new structure, the market is now a major attraction for our local shoppers from Russell, Wise, Dickenson,. and Scott counties. The Farmers Market Committee can be proud of their accomplishments in 2012. Another planned addition for long term use is the Blue Belle Island, Clinch River, and Sugar Hill Loop trail. We are closer every day to putting the trail online. With good weather in the spring, both the walking and bike trails should be ready to open. The Town of St. Paul experienced a tragic fire in the Stonebriar Apartments this year, which resulted in one death. One of the issues arising from this horrific event is the need to improve and shorten emergency response time between emer- gency services from Wise, Russell, and Dickenson counties. In that respect, a joint resolution was passed that allows all emer- gency crews to respond to any emergency call in the area. This action will define responsibility and hasten the response time without interference. Two other major activities that involve St. Paul and the surrounding area are Clinch River Days and our Christmas Bazaar. Both events have had increasing success each year. The committees for both events start planning immediately for the next year and we should appreciated the hard work in organizing and planning these annual events. I would also like to thank all of the organizations that participated in the Christ- mas Parade, as well as Guy White for leading the parade and carrying the national colors and both Castlewood and Eastiside marching bands for the wonder- ful music they provided. Catching the cow by Jerry Couch The history article I'm currently working on is taking a while to finish. In the meantime here's a story of life in South St. Paul on Couch Hill to entertain you. Many of you have also experienced this vanished Way of life, once so common. When I was a boy, Uncle Dule Couch always kept one or two Jersey cows. These cows supplied both his family and ours with dairy products. Aunt Edith milked those cows each more efficient than older models morning and evening. She and reduce the amount of processed the milk and made greenhouse gasses emitted. A butter from the cream. The qualified boiler can be up to 5 , butter was a rich yellow color, percent more efficient than with plenty of salt added for standard models. flavor, Aunt Edith mde her butter with pride and skill. The Celebrate music at T'_ __ tlngs 00napel butter pats were very firm when Rings Chapel Baptist Church begins at 7:00 p.m. on January 6. chilled, almost too firm to cut of Castlewood would like to The church is located just off with anything but the sharpest invite the publ'ic to come Route 58 on Memorial Drive, knife. facing window blinds and celebrate the music ministry of Castlewood. For more informa- curtains to let the sun in and reduce the load on your heating Kelly Nelson Mullins. Service tion please call 276-762-0396.  : : :=:= " Z ....................................................................................... "N III ITI--I1 Calendar of events... AA-Sundays and Tuesdays.'-Big needed-training available. Call 1- ...The"/ise County School Board Stone Gap, 8 pm, Episcopal Church. Wednesdays: Wise, 8 pro, Trinity United Methodist Church• Fridays: Clintwood, 7:30 pro, Clintwood United Methodist Church. COPPER CREEK ELEMENT- ARY PTA-3rd Monday, 7 pm school cafeteria. ST, PAUL IDA BOARD-Fourth Mondays, 6 pm, St. Paul Town Hall. ST. PAUL TOWN COUNCIL- Third Mondays, 6 pm, Town Hall. CASTLEWOOD W&SA-The Castlewood Water & Sewage Authority Board of Directors, 6 pm second Mondays. ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT- First Tuesday, 1 pro, Appalachian Agency for Senior Citizens office, Claypool Hill. Free. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS- Tuesdays and Saturdays, 8 pm Presbyterian Church, Norton. CASTLEWOOD LODGE #231- Stated meetings will be held the third Saturday of each month. The School of Instruction will be held on fourth Thursdays at 7. ST. PAUL LODGE #343-Second Thursdays, 7:30 pm, Stated Com-. munication; First Thursday, 7 pm School of Instruction. VFW POST #8652, DAV UHAPTER 12-4th Tuesday, 7 m, VFW, Riverview, Coeburn. NEIGHBORS AID-Thursdays, 9:30 to 12. St. Therese's Neigh- bors Aid Building, new & used clothing for sale. RUSSELL CO. BOARD OF SUPERVISORS-First Monday, 6 pm, Lebanon. 'CLINCHFIELD LODGE #256- Stated Communication, 1st Satur- days, 7:30; School of Instruction third Thursdays, 7 pm RECOVERY GROUP-The Wise County Mental Health Center conducts a recovery group for sub- stance abusers and families Fridays at 10 am Call 276-679- 0810. ACOA MEETING-Adult Chil- dren of Alcoholics meet Mondays, 7 pm, First Baptist Church, Coeburn. Call 762-0016, 276-395- 6588 or 276-679-7371. LITTLE LEAGUE-The Clinch River Little League Board meet at 4 pm third Sundays at the UMWA Building in Castlewood. All interested persons are invited to attend. H.O.P.E. HOUSE-H.O.P.E. Hou- se provides emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence in Wise, Russell, Dickenson,' Lee, Scott and Buchanan counties and the City of Norton. Volunteers 800-572-2278. maintains a Policy Manual which SENIOR CITIZENS-The Castle- is available to the public in the wood Senior Citizens meet at 10 library of each schobl and in each am Wednesdays at the Castlewood county public library. Lions Den. Anyone 60 or over is ,,,Copies of the Russell County invited. School Board Policy Manual have The Dante Senior Citizens meet been placed in the office and the each Monday and Tuesday at 10 library of each school, and at the am at the Dante Fire Department. Russell County Public Library. Russell County residents 60 or SUPPORT GROUP-Women older are invited, survivors of sexual assault are RUSSELL CO LIBRARY-Hours invited to attend Clinch Valley at the Russell COunty Public Communication Action, Library, Lebanon, are M/Tu 9am- Inc./Family Crisis Services' sup- 7pm, W/F 9am-5:30pm, Th 9am- port group meeting with victims of 8pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Sun 2-5pm. similar situations Mondays, 10:30 MATTHEWS LIBRARY-Hours am-12 noon. For information call at the J. Fred Matthews Memorial Rande Hackler, 276-988-5583 or Library, St. Patti, are 9am-5pm RanettaDavis, 276-889-8206. Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays/Sat FREE ADULT ED-Free adult urdays, and I lam-7:30pm Tues- education classes are available in days and Thursdays. See Library Lee, Scott and Wise counties and for special program schedules, the City of Norton. Daytime and DICKENSON-BUNDY-The evening classes for adults who Dickenson-Bundy Log House is want to improve their basic skills. open weekly Thursdays through Instructors also assist adults with Saturdays, 10-3, and'Sundays 12-4 job-related skills including re- pm. sume, writing and interviewing. SOCIAL SECURITY-The Wise For details, call 1-800-422-3433 or Social Security Office is open 276-386-2433. Mondays-Fridays from 9am-4pm. TRANSPORTATION-The Ap- Phone numbers are 1-800-772- palachian Agency for Senior Citi- 1213 or 276-679-7633. zens provides disability transport- LIBRARY FRIENDS-Friends of ation services in Buchanan, the J. Fred Matthews Memorial Dickenson, Russell and Tazewell Library, St. Paul meet at the counties to individuals with Library on first Thursdays at 4 pro. disabilities, regardless of.age. Call VFW POST 9864-VFW Post 1-888-656-2272. 9864, Lebanon, welcomes new GENEALOGY GROUP-The members. If you served overseas Russell County Genealogy Group during any war, write VFW Post meets 5:30 pm first Thursdays, 9864, P.O. Box 1419, Lebanon, Russell County Public Library, VA 24266 and send name, address, Lebanon. The Group purpose is and phone number. Transfers "to learn, to share and to welcomed, perpetuate family history." Call HEALTH SERVICES-The Wise William T. Fuller, 276-623-3410 County Health Department, Wise, or fullerjr1942.yahoo.com is open from 8am-8pm first JOIN THE FRIENDS-Join the Thursdays. Clinics will be offered Friends of J. Fred Matthews Mere- in family planning, pediatrics, orial Library and help promote the school and adult physicals, WIC, improvement of facilities and Paps and immunizations. Ap- services of the library. Send name, pointments are necessary for all address and phone number, with a but immunizations. For an $5 membership gift, to J. Fred appointment, call 762-328-8000. Matthews Memorial Library, P.O. FACILITIES AVAILABLE-The Box 1976, St. Paul, VA 24283. Tacoma Community Center is Make checks payable to Friends 6f available for reunions, birthdays the J. Fred Matthews Mmorial and shov*ers. All proceeds Library. rehabilitate the Tacoma School as EASTERN STAR-Clinch Valley a Community Ccuter. For infor- Chapter #152, Order of Eastern marion, call 395-6398. Star, meets each fourth Tuesday, 100 TM BIRTHDAY-Appalachian except for March and December, Agency for Senior Citizens when the meetings are on the recognizes persons in Russell, second Tuesday. All meetings are Dickenson, Buchanan and Taze- at 7:30 p.m. well counties who are 100 )'ears VETERANS' CLAIMS-Dicken- old or Nder. Call Dana Collins, I- son County-Oscar Silcox helps file 800-656-2272, to'advise AASC of veterans' claims. For appointment, any upcoming 100 th birthday, call 276-835-8847 nights. SCHOOL POLICIES Coeburn-'A Dept. of Veterans Services representative will assist clients and answer questions at the Coeburn VFW Post from 9am- Church and church-related activities 3:30 pm third Thursdays except June. FOOD BANK-First Baptist Church, St. Paul, operates a Food Bank each Tuesday from 9-11 am at the church. Donations are welcomed. All in need of food are welcome. COMMUNITY CENTER-The West Dante Community Center meets at 7 pm first Mondays. For more information please call 495- 8473. CLOTHES CLOSET-The Wom- en On Mission group at First Baptist Church, St. Paul, opens a Clothes Closet from 9-11 am Tuesdays. Anyone who needs clothing is welcome• FREE HIV TESTING-Health Departments in the Lenowisco Health District offer free confid- ential HIV testing throughout the year. For information, call Wise County 318-8000; Lee Co. Health Dept. 276-346-2011;" or Scott Co. Health Dept. 276-386-1312. FREE GED CLASSES-Free GED classes are offered at the Oxbow Family Investment Center, St. Paul, Mondays and Wed- nesdays from 8:30 am-12 noon. Glenna McReynolds is the teacher. Call 1-800-422-3433. GED ONLINE-The Regional Adult Education Program is offering flee GED Classes online. This service is for qualifying and adult learners, with or without their own home computers, in Lee, Scott and Wise counties and the City of Norton. For more information, call GED Online Coordinator Marci Gore, 1-800- 422-3433 (in Scott County 386- 243"3). GED TESTING-GED Testing is available Monday through Thursday and on Saturdays at the Wise Co. Alternative Education Center, Wise. Call 276-328-8612 for information concerning GED testing. IN CONTROL PROGRAMS-In Control, a free diabetes program, meets at Oxbow Center, St. Paul, nd 5-6 pm 2 Mondays. DANTE LIVES ON-The Dante Lives On Board meets at 6:00 pm d Y Tuesdays at the Dante Museum with the Community Meeting following at 7:00 pro. GOSPEL SINGING-A Gospel Singing will be held at 7 pm the first Friday of each month at The Celebration Center, 16607 Broad Street, St. Paul. All are welcome - admission is free. BOOK DISCUSSION-Book Discussion Group One of the J. Fred Matthews Memorial Library meets fourth Thursdays (except November and December are combined in early December) at the Riverside Diner at 6 pro. calendar on page 3 One of the cows providing this wonderful milk and butter • was Old Pet, a black Jersey heifer. She was a very smart cow. Using her horns, she would open the barn door and go inside to patiently wait for milking time. She even endured letting us kids ride on her back. She was bred regularly so that she would remain "fresh," in other words, give milk. Her calves were sold because they weren't rleeded on the farm. Finally, Old Pet developed a health problem and could no longer produce milk. She was taken to the market and sold (a small farm is a model for pragmatism). A replacement cow was purchased. We named her Jewel because she had a diamond-shaped white spot on her forehead. Jewel showed none of the thoughtful charact- eristics of her predecessor. She was neither gentle nor patient. She often kicked the milk bucket over or failed to show up at milking time and had to be fetched. Jewel had a mean streak and a special dislike reserved for dogs. Perhaps this was genetic for she passed these traits to her calf, a heifer we never got around to naming. The birth of this calf was the start of trouble although we didn't know if at the time. She was verv olavful and followed my cousin Roger and me around like a pet dog, delighting in attention. My father and Uncle Dule noticed this and told us not to make a pet of the calf; that cows were farm animals, not pets. Naturally we disregarded this advice. The sweet calf that ran down the hill to meet us when we got home from school soon grew into a large cow. She continued to run excitedly down the hill at top speed to join us, only now we wondered if she would be able to stop before she bowled us into the river. To make matters worse, she decided she was "herd leader." She would sneak up behind us and butt us with her head, sending us sprawling. We weren't supposed to hit the cG-v but her attacks were The Main Street and Down. town Rehabilitation Committee continue to reflect commendable progress for our downtown area. We ended 2012 with some visible changes starting to take place, such as awnings, new facades, storefront painting anc cleanup. As we enter into 2013 we will see the facade work be completed by late summer. Th Willis Building will receive facelifi and we will constantl) be presenting this building tc contractors as an investment in the future downtown business expansion tying into tourism and canoeing, overnight lodging, and permanent apartments. St. Paul is fortunate that most of this work is supposed by grants. We hope to expand this source ot revenue and other efforts te continue improvement to the downtown area. As mayor, I hope to work with the Town Council to review the plans to redesign the A. R. Matthews Park to better allocate our resources and update the ?Continued on page 2)- Couch Hill Barn & Blacksmith Shop ca. 1948 escalating so we had to do something. Usually, after a quick look around to see if Uncle Dule was watching, we would whack her with a tree limb or thump her with rocks. She eventually got the message but her feelings were hurt. She became hostile and wary. We had taught her to think she was one of us and now she con- firmed the truth of Uncle Dule's warning about pet cows. We were getting our education the hard wly. The cow no longer confined her bad behavior to Roger and me. She terrorized my mother, who was afraid of most animals. The cow would wait for my mother at the garden gate then chase her. My mother would take refuge among the com- ponents of a rusting pile of junk beside the farm shop. The cow would lower her head and shake her horns menacingly. My mother, cowering in the junk- pile, would utter ineffective commands such as "Shooo!" and "Get away from here right now!" The cow would stand her ground, unimpressed, stomping her front hooves and snorting. Watching this scenario from the porch, my father would roll his eyes then look at me and say, "Go rescue your mother." This was when I became convinced that cows can laugh. One hot summer afternoon the cow didn't show up at milk- ing timel This was n o surprise It was one of her favorite tricks. Roger went to look for her. He found her standing in the cool. shade of a paw-paw thicket lo- cated above our vegetable gar- den. She was chewing idly and swishing her tail - the picture of docile, bovine innocence. Roger had brought a rope in case the cow decided not to cooperate. He quickly slipped the rope over her head before she realized what was hap- pening. He could tell she didn't like this but she began walking along the path toward the barn peacefully enough. After a few minutes, Roger let his guard down. Sensing her opportunity, the cow bolted. The rope zipped• painfully through Roger's hands. The cow galloped along the path ahead, the rope around her neck trailing in the dust behind her. Suddenly the cow stepped on the rope. Her head was violently jerked to the ground between her front legs but her body kept moving. Roger had a fleeting view of four hooves in the air as the cow was flung head-over- heels. She landed on her back in a cloud of dust with an audible "OOOOFffl" The breath had been knocked out of her. In panic, Roger thought, "Oh no! She's DEAD! I've killed Daddy's cow!" Roger ran up the path to see if the cow was alive. She lay there on the ground a moment, stunned and breathless. Finally her body shuddered as she sucked kn a great gulp of air. Roger grabbed the rope once more. The cow struggled to her feet. Much humbled, she pro- ceeded along the path. She was probably thinking "How did he DO that?" Eventually, both cows were sold. Times had changed and no one kept cows for domestic pur- poses anymore. Our milk was purchased in cartons and the homemade butter was replaced by margarine in packages. My son was four years old before he even realized milk came from cows, not gallon plastic jugs. Old Pet, Jewel, and her daughter have passed into memory; where they chew their cud and their breath smells like grass...